More Historic Newspapers from Independence, OR, Online!

Even more historic newspapers from Independence, Oregon, are now on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website, thanks to a partnership with the Independence Public Library, and funding from the Polk County Cultural Coalition and Friends of the Independence Public Library.

The historic Independence, Oregon, newspapers the West Side and the West Side Enterprise, as well as additional issues of Independence Enterprise, have been added to Historic Oregon Newspapers. So much excellent historic newspaper content!

Independence west side. (Independence, Or.) March 15, 1901, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/2011260136/1901-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/

Independence west side. (Independence, Or.) March 15, 1901, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/2011260136/1901-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/

The West Side was established in the 1880s and ceased publication at the turn of the century. Published on a weekly basis, the West Side kept the citizens of Independence, Polk County, Oregon, abreast of local, national, and international news. Front-page headlines for its March 15, 1901, issue (the masthead for which can be seen above) include “Oregon State News” (“A new opera house is to be built at Eugene”; “The Baker City post office will have a stamp-cancelling machine”), “News of the Week” (“Carnegie denies that he is going to Europe with J.P. Morgan”), and “Almost a Clash” (“Friction Between the British and Russians at Tien Tsin”).

West side enterprise. (Independence, Polk County, Or.) August 3, 1906, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088099/1906-08-03/ed-1/seq-1/

West side enterprise. (Independence, Polk County, Or.) August 3, 1906, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088099/1906-08-03/ed-1/seq-1/

Published twice a week for much of its existence, the West Side Enterprise served the people of Independence, Polk County, Oregon, for just four years, from 1904 to 1908. The first issue of the West Side Enterprise was printed on January 14, 1904; its last, on October 8, 1908. Above is the masthead from the August 3, 1906, issue of the West Side Enterprise. Front-page headlines for this issue include “Gives Franchise” (“County Court Acts on Application of Falls City and Dallas Railroad”), “He Goes to Jail” (“George Hoaglin Makes Gun Play and Gets a Pummeling as a Result”), and “California is Booming” (“In the state, conditions indicate one of the most prosperous years in the history of California”). Like the West Side, the West Side Enterprise reported on news happening locally, nationally, and internationally.

The Independence Enterprise was published by the Enterprise Pub. Co., beginning in the 1890s.  It would continue to be published on a weekly basis through the 1900s. Using a quote by Thomas Jefferson as an early motto (“Eternal Vigilance is the Price of Liberty”), the Independence Enterprise was vigilant in keeping up on a variety of news events, from happenings in the arts and politics, to goings-on in commerce, education, and local society. Front-page news for the Independence Enterprise in its October 2, 1902, issue (seen below) was the success of Susie Fennel Pipes, a violinist who was born in Independence but who would go on to gain greater renown for her musical talents in Portland, Oregon. “Former Independence Girl Winning Name for Herself” says the headline just above a photo of Pipes holding her violin and bow. Front-page coverage of Pipes further informed readers of her upcoming concerts.

In its later years, the Independence Enterprise would merge with the West Side newspaper to become the Independence Enterprise and West Side. The newspaper’s name change can be seen on the front page of the October 2, 1902, issue below.

As with all newspapers on Historic Oregon Newspapers, these newly added issues of the West Side and the West Side Enterprise, as well as the additional issues of the Independence Enterprise, can be read, searched by keyword, downloaded, and saved as a PDF or JPEG for future perusal – at no cost to users! Enjoy this new content on Historic Oregon Newspapers!

Independence enterprise. : (Independence, Polk County, Or.) October 2, 1902. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088097/1902-10-02/ed-1/seq-1/

Independence enterprise. : (Independence, Polk County, Or.) October 2, 1902. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088097/1902-10-02/ed-1/seq-1/

Posted in Announcements

Monmouth Herald – More Added!

Thanks to a partnership with the Monmouth Public Library, and funding from the Polk County Cultural Coalition and Monmouth Friends of the Library, even more issues of the Monmouth Herald have been added to the Historic Oregon Newspapers website!

Monmouth herald. (Monmouth, Or.) June 11, 1909. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088093/1909-06-11/ed-1/seq-1/

Monmouth herald. (Monmouth, Or.) June 11, 1909. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088093/1909-06-11/ed-1/seq-1/

In print from 1908 through 1969, the Monmouth Herald kept the people of Monmouth, Oregon, informed, reporting on local, national, and international news events. The newspaper came out on a weekly basis until its last issue, published on June 26, 1969. Its publisher was Acorn Press.

The Monmouth Herald can still be read, researched, and enjoyed, with issues available for free online at the Historic Oregon Newspapers website. Additional issues of the Monmouth Herald now up on the Historic Oregon Newspapers site range in date from September 4, 1908, through March 24, 1927. As with all newspapers on Historic Oregon Newspapers, each issue of the Monmouth Herald can be searched by keyword because of optical character recognition (OCR) technology. In addition, each issue of the newspaper can be downloaded and saved as a PDF or JPEG file, at absolutely no cost to visitors to the Historic Oregon Newspapers website.

Check out these additional issues of Monmouth Herald on Historic Oregon Newspapers today!

Monmouth herald. (Monmouth, Or.) November 25, 1926. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088093/1926-11-25/ed-1/seq-1/

Monmouth herald. (Monmouth, Or.) November 25, 1926. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088093/1926-11-25/ed-1/seq-1/

Posted in Announcements

More Historic Morrow County Newspapers Added!

A partnership with the Morrow County Museum in Heppner, Oregon, means more historic newspapers are now up on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website!

Fresh new content on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website includes the Boardman Mirror, which informed the citizens of Boardman, Morrow County, Oregon, on a weekly basis from 1921 to 1925. Historic Oregon Newspapers now has the complete run of the Boardman Mirror, from the first issue, published on February 11, 1921, to the last, printed on September 4, 1925.

Boardman mirror. (Boardman, Or.) September 4, 1925. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088002/1925-09-04/ed-1/seq-1/

Boardman mirror. (Boardman, Or.) September 4, 1925. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088002/1925-09-04/ed-1/seq-1/

In addition to the Boardman Mirror, four newspapers that served the people of Ione, Oregon, are now available on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website. They are the Ione Bulletin (June 12, 1913 – September 11, 1913), the Ione Independent (January 4, 1924 – June 19, 1931), the Ione Journal (April 28, 1915 – April 12, 1916), and the Ione Proclaimer (Jume 25, 1909 – December 10, 1909). So much great historic newspaper content to read, research, and enjoy!

Ione independent. (Ione, Or.) January 18, 1924. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071039/1924-01-18/ed-1/seq-1/

Ione independent. (Ione, Or.) January 18, 1924. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071039/1924-01-18/ed-1/seq-1/

Ione independent. (Ione, Or.) June 25, 1909. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071034/1909-06-25/ed-1/seq-1/

Ione independent. (Ione, Or.) June 25, 1909. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071034/1909-06-25/ed-1/seq-1/

Lexington wheatfield. (Lexington, Or.) October 26, 1905. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071052/1905-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

Lexington wheatfield. (Lexington, Or.) October 26, 1905. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071052/1905-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

Historic Oregon Newspapers now also has the Lexington Wheatfield (September 28, 1905 – September 19, 1907) and the Lexington Weekly Budget (November 14, 1889 – September 25, 1890). Both of these Historic Oregon Newspapers were printed for and read by the residents of Lexington, Morrow County, Oregon. Additionally, both newspapers were published on a weekly basis. Alternate titles of these historic newspapers are the Wheatfield and the Weekly Budget, respectively. All content of these historic Oregon papers can now be viewed – at no cost to you!

Lexington weekly budget. (Lexington, Morrow County, Or.) May 15, 1890. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071051/1890-05-15/ed-1/seq-1/

Lexington weekly budget. (Lexington, Morrow County, Or.) May 15, 1890. Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071051/1890-05-15/ed-1/seq-1/

Posted in Announcements

The Story of Valentine’s Day, as Told by Historic Oregon Newspapers

“Tomorrow, Valentine, the patron saint of all lovers, especially amateurs, will receive proper recognition all over the civilized world.”

This is how The Dalles Daily Chronicle began its February 13, 1895, article “St. Valentine’s Day.” The newspaper served the people of The Dalles, Oregon, from 1890 to 1948.

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 2, 1913, Image 21. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1913-02-02/ed-1/seq-21/

After a cursory mention of how Valentine’s Day is celebrated (“The handsome souvenir, telling of love, will rest in the mailsacks alongside of the gaudily-colored caricature, telling of envy, malice, or spice”), The Dalles Daily Chronicle article lengthily delves into the history of the holiday:

“How the day came to be kept in the way it is, is more than anyone knows. St. Valentine himself is rather an uncertain personage, as it is hard to tell which Valentine the day is kept for. It is sometimes ascribed to Pope Valentine, who occupied the papal chair for thirty or forty days about the year 827, and of whom some one with A. P. A. proclivities, many years ago, remarked that ‘He was too good a man to make a good pope, and so he died within forty days of his assuming the office.’ St. Valentine’s day was not kept on his account however.”

The Dalles Daily Chronicle article goes on to further explore the seemingly hazy origins of Valentine’s Day, hypothesizing about its beginnings. Historic Oregon newspapers that were published around the turn of the century typically took the tack of reporting on the origins of Valentine’s Day when covering the holiday. For the Sunday Oregonian, the tone of this reportage is somber and somewhat chiding, noting the secularization of a holiday that had its roots in the church and was named after a religious figure. This sentiment is clearly evident in a February 11, 1906, article succinctly titled “Saint’s Day That Cupid Stole.”

The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 11, 1906, Image 40. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1906-02-11/ed-1/seq-40/

The Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 11, 1906, Image 40. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1906-02-11/ed-1/seq-40/

The Sunday Oregonian article notes that “St. Valentine’s Day began somewhere about the opening of the third century. It is a quaint combination of religion and sentiment. It represents the dual worship of a great man of the church, and Cupid, the mischievous patron saint of love.”

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 2, 1913, Image 21. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1913-02-02/ed-1/seq-21/

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 2, 1913, Image 21. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1913-02-02/ed-1/seq-21/

The February 11, 1906, article in the Sunday Oregonian continues:

“It was a queer beginning for a great holiday that people should have united on the same day to honor St. Valentine and Cupid. No more dissimilar deities could be found… St. Valentine was an early day martyr. He died for the church, and in commemoration of his goodness and piety the Holy See set aside February 14 as the day on which the faithful should do honor to his memory… Eventually the young folk passed from the purely religious feature of the holiday, and began to give it a somewhat secular tone… Thus in a gradual way Cupid had come to usurp the place that St. Valentine had once held all alone, and what was originally a time of prayer gradually transformed itself into the season when love sent out its messengers and pleas.”

Three years later, the Sunday Oregonian, in its coverage of Valentine’s Day, took a different, lighter approach. The paper declared: “Should Have Been Cupid’s Day, Not St. Valentine’s.”

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 14, 1909, Image 52. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1909-02-14/ed-1/seq-52/#date1=1870&sort=relevance&rows=20&words=Day+day+VALENTINE+Valentine&searchType=advanced&sequence=0&index=15&proxdistance=5&date2=1950&ortext=&proxtext=valentine%27s+day&phrasetext=&andtext=&dateFilterType=yearRange&page=1

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Ore.) February 14, 1909, Image 52. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1909-02-14/ed-1/seq-52

In this February 14, 1909, article, the Sunday Oregonian focuses less on the Christian origins of Valentine’s Day and more on Cupid and the tales of Greek mythology from which “the jolly little god of love” arose. The newspaper concedes that “Not many of the young folks who on this occasion will try by divers means to lift the veil of the future and try to determine who their future husbands and wives will be know much of St. Valentine, but all of them are well supplied with information on the subject of that tormenting sprite, Cupid, whose venomed darts lead the way to the altar.” The paper’s defeatist view on the subject is aptly reflected in the article’s subhead: “Wrong and Inappropriate Name Became Attached to February 14 and Can Not Be Changed.”

The Boardman Mirror, like The Dalles Daily Chronicle and the Sunday Oregonian, also ran in-depth articles that looked at the story behind Valentine’s Day. The newspaper was in print for just four years, from 1921 to 1925, and its readership were the citizens of Boardman, Oregon. Reflecting the Sunday Oregonian‘s later coverage of Valentine’s Day, the Boardman Mirror also chose to highlight the pagan history of the holiday. It did so in the February 6, 1925, article “Valentine’s Day of Pagan Origin.” However, unlike the Sunday Oregonian, the Boardman Mirror downplayed, if not outright dismissed, the role of St. Valentine and of Christianity in the formation of the holiday. The newspaper took its opposite stance even further, boldly stating it wasn’t Cupid who “had come to usurp the place that St. Valentine had once held all alone,” but it was Christianity that “‘took over’ the pagan festivals and adapted them to its own uses.”

In the February 6, 1925, article, the Boardman Mirror explains:

“In ancient Rome a sort of love lottery was annually held at the time of the festival called the Supercalia, because it was believed that at that season of the year birds chose their mates. It was a festival celebrated in February, in honor of Pan and Juno, and tablets bearing young women’s names were drawn out of a box by the young men. Each youth availing himself of this privilege was expected to be until the next Supercalia the faithful attendant of her whose name he had drawn.

“It was a pretty custom, and worth preserving. So Christianity, when it ‘took over’ the pagan festivals and adapted them to its own uses, kept the anniversary of the Supercalia as St. Valentine’s day, renaming it in honor of a holy martyr, who had been done to death at Rome in the Third century, A. D.

“There was no special reason why St. Valentine should be chosen in preference to any other saint. It does not appear that he took any particular interest in lovers and love-making. But, having first been clubbed to death and then beheaded, he deserved to be immortalized in some fashion, and in this way the object was obtained.”

It is enlightening, and even entertaining (depending on your disposition), to witness the different ways in which historic Oregon newspapers describe the origins of Valentine’s Day. Although their viewpoints were not always in alignment, these historic newspapers did faithfully print articles on the history of the holiday, year after year – at least around the turn of the century. Regardless of what readers of this blog believe about the holiday, it is hoped that Valentine’s Day will be a pleasant holiday for you all. As The Dalles Daily Chronicle says in its February 13, 1895, article, “We hope The Chronicle readers – especially the young perusers of our invaluable sheet – will all receive a quantum suf. of billing doves, pierced hearts, and the divers and sundry emblems that show how much and how anguishingly they are beloved.”

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More Heppner Gazette-Times!

Thanks to a partnership with Morrow County Museum in Heppner, Oregon, more great issues of the Heppner Gazette-Times are now available on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website.

heppner_gazette_times_front_page_19601027

Heppner gazette-times. (Heppner, Or.) October 27, 1960, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn97071042/1960-10-27/ed-2/seq-1/

Now, visitors to the Historic Oregon Newspapers website can access issues of the Heppner Gazette-Times from July 5, 1951, through December 30, 1976. This new content is a huge boost to the robust collection of Heppner Gazette-Times issues already online at Historic Oregon Newspapers. As with all issues on the Historic Oregon Newspapers website, these additional issues of the Heppner Gazette-Times can be read, searched by keyword, downloaded, and saved as a PDF or JPEG file for future perusal – all at no cost to users!

The Heppner-Gazette Times has been in print since 1925. For more than 80 years, the Heppner, Oregon, newspaper has chronicled news at the local level in Morrow County and at the state and national levels. For an introduction to Heppner, Oregon, and its history, see the blog post “Morrow County Now Represented in Historic Oregon Newspapers Online!

In addition to the partnership with the Morrow County Museum, this excellent new content was also made possible by copyright permission given by the Heppner Gazette-Times.

Posted in Announcements, New Content

Oregon Finishes Work on the National Digital Newspaper Program

Since 2009, the University of Oregon (UO) Libraries’ Oregon Digital Newspaper Program (ODNP) has participated in the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a grant-funded initiative led by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress to digitize historic newspapers from across the United States to be made available online at Chronicling America. As of November 2015, after completing three rounds of funding, Oregon’s participation in the NDNP has drawn to a close.

Over the course of six years, the ODNP has digitized over 300,000 pages of historic newspaper content for Chronicling America, also available online at Historic Oregon Newspapers. The ODNP Advisory Board, with input from public libraries and historical societies across Oregon, selected a total of 60 newspaper titles for inclusion in the project, ranging from prominent dailies such as the Portland Morning Oregonian, Pendleton East Oregonian, and the Morning Astorian, to small town papers such as the Echo Register and Spray Courier, and so much more!

Grant funding from the NDNP has also supported the production of new and improved K-12 lesson plans for using historic newspapers to meet Oregon common core standards in the classroom, as well as initial funding for the Open-ONI (Online Newspaper Initiative) collaborative open-source project to enhance the Library of Congress’ chronam software, with the goal of making it easier for state institutions to host newspapers online.

Many thanks to the NDNP, partner institutions across the state, and all of the current and former staff and student workers at the UO Libraries for making this project a success over the years! But don’t worry, the ODNP is continuing beyond NDNP funding, working with other institutions and donors across the state to secure funding to continue adding valuable historic newspaper content to the online collection. Additionally, a selection of current newspapers published in 2015 and beyond are also being added to the Historic Oregon Newspapers online collection as we continue to preserve and provide access to Oregon’s history in the making. Visit our blog at http://odnp.uoregon.edu to stay up to date with the latest ODNP news and collection additions.

 

 

Posted in Announcements, Chronicling America, Library of Congress, National Endowment for the Humanities

Thanksgiving Charity, as Seen in Morning Oregonian, 1906-1913

Giving back on Thanksgiving is a time-honored tradition, one that has been reported on throughout the decades by historic Oregon newspapers. One such historic Oregon newspaper, the Morning Oregonian, faithfully chronicled how the people of Portland, Oregon, have been charitable to those with less during a holiday that is celebrated by sharing abundance.

Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) November 30, 1906, Image 11. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1906-11-30/ed-1/seq-11/

Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) November 30, 1906, Image 11. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1906-11-30/ed-1/seq-11/

Looking through the pages of the Morning Oregonian, from 1906 through 1913, it becomes apparent that a favorite focus was how Portland’s littlest residents benefited from the generosity of others on Thanksgiving. In a November 30, 1906, article titled “Big Dinners for Little People,” the Morning Oregonian assured that “Babies Not Overlooked” in the marking of the holiday. These babies who got to partake in the bounty of Thanksgiving were sheltered by the Baby Home, established in 1888 to house homeless and neglected infants. On November 30, 1906, the Morning Oregonian reported:

The tiny tots at the Baby Home were too young to understand the reasons for the observance of Thanksgiving Day, but they were old enough to realize that a Thanksgiving feast was not something that could be enjoyed every day. There are 16 babies at the Home and 10 of them were old enough and strong enough to sit at the tables. For more than an hour they literally stuffed themselves with the good, old New England bird, roasted to a turn, and the many other good things that go to make up a regulation Thanksgiving dinner.

Like the Baby Home, the Boys’ and Girls’ Aid Society was established as a haven for Portland’s homeless youth. The Boys’ and Girls’ Aid Society was founded just three years prior to the Baby Home, in 1885, but it had the similar mission “to improve the condition of the homeless, neglected, and the abused.” The same November 30, 1906, Morning Oregonian article stated:

Sixty-four little boys and girls sat down to dinner in the home of the Boys’ and Girls’ Aid Society and sixty-four full-grown men and women could not possibly have eaten more than they. They had everything that was really worth eating. Turkey, of course, cranberries, oysters, sweet potatoes, rich brown gravy, mince, pumpkin pies, etc.

In its November 29, 1912, edition, the Morning Oregonian ran a photograph of children in the care of the Boys’ and Girls’ Aid Society sitting at rows of tables set for Thanksgiving dinner, with each table having its own a robust roasted turkey. The photograph was published alongside the article “Happy Day Passed: Orphans and Invalids Receive Additional Attention.” Its caption read: “There were no keener appetites in Portland yesterday than these.”

Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) November 29, 1912, Image 20. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1912-11-29/ed-1/seq-20/

Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) November 29, 1912, Image 20. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1912-11-29/ed-1/seq-20/

The following Thanksgiving, in 1913, the Morning Oregonian recounted how the boys and girls who resided at the Children’s Home in South Portland were “made happy” on the holiday. The Children’s Home was “a dormitory for impoverished and orphaned children” that had opened its doors in 1884. In the November 28, 1913, article “‘Turk’ Holds Sway on Charity Day” that had the subtitle “Children’s Homes Remembered by Benefactors,” the Morning Oregonian noted:

At the Children’s Home, in South Portland, six lavishly laden tables were arranged for the 84 little boys and girls of the institution. Each table was presided over by an attendant and it was wonderful to see the bright, happy faces of the kiddies when the big, brown turkey appeared. Such radiant happiness could only be characteristic of childhood. The soup plates soon were empty and then came the principal part of the dinner – the turkey. With it there were celery, vegetables and cranberry sauce. When each child had eaten all he wanted, there was ice cream, cake and fruit for everyone.

“There was enough turkey for everyone,” read the caption of the photograph that accompanied the article. In the photograph, there is row upon row of boys and girls at the Children’s Home, each child wearing his or her holiday best and enjoying the Thanksgiving meal. Some of the children seemed to have cheeks filled with food as they turned to look at the camera.

Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) November 28, 1913, Image 18. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1913-11-28/ed-1/seq-18/

Morning Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) November 28, 1913, Image 18. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83025138/1913-11-28/ed-1/seq-18/

In the November 28, 1913, article “‘Turk’ Holds Sway on Charity Day,” the Morning Oregonian further reported:

The children in the home all were healthy and happy and gave evidence of great care on the part of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Matlock and the assistants. The donations received at the Children’s Home came largely from the public school children and consisted of dozens of jars of jam, glasses of jelly, canned goods of all varieties, package goods, potatoes and apples. Miss Miriam Jacobs sent cakes and turkeys were donated by Mrs. H. W. Corbett, Mrs. C. H. Lewis, Miss Sally Lewis, Kessler and Fry, Mrs. P. J. Mann and others.

On this Thanksgiving, may we all be as charitable as Miss Miriam Jacobs, Mrs. H. W. Corbett, Mrs. C. H. Lewis, Miss Sally Lewis, Kessler and Fry, and Mrs. P. J. Mann were toward the less-fortunate little ones of 1913 Portland. Whether the holiday season is spent with the family we were born into or the one that we chose, perhaps we can take time to give back to the community in one way or another, whether it is initiating a food drive, donating food to a charitable institution or organization, or lending a helping hand at a local soup kitchen. As the Morning Oregonian shows in its early 20th-century reportage, giving back on Thanksgiving can “make happy” those who could benefit from our kindness the most.

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Historic Oregon Newspapers: Even More NEW Content!

More than 9,000 pages of historic newspaper content have been added to the Historic Oregon Newspapers website! Much of this content is from papers that served Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon, including Corvallis Gazette, Corvallis Times, Union Gazette, and Oregon Union.

Oregon union. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) November 19, 1897, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn85042402/1897-11-19/ed-1/seq-1/

Oregon union. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) November 19, 1897, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn85042402/1897-11-19/ed-1/seq-1/

Rich in fascinating historic content, the new additions to Historic Oregon Newspapers are:

Athena, Umatilla County, OR. The Athena Press (June 9, 1893-Jan. 8, 1909)

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. The Benton Democrat (Dec. 28, 1872-June 21, 1873)

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. The Corvallis Gazette (April 22, 1865-Dec. 30, 1898)

The Athena press. (Athena, Umatilla County, Or.) August 14, 1908, Image 71. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088356/1908-08-14/ed-1/seq-1/

The Athena press. (Athena, Umatilla County, Or.) August 14, 1908, Image 71. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn96088356/1908-08-14/ed-1/seq-1/

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. Corvallis Gazette (April 27, 1900-Dec. 29, 1908)

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. The Corvallis Times (June 2, 1900-Dec. 30, 1903)

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. The Oregon Union (Feb. 28, 1863)

Benton democrat. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) April 26, 1873, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn84022649/1873-04-26/ed-1/seq-1/

Benton democrat. (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) April 26, 1873, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn84022649/1873-04-26/ed-1/seq-1/

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. Oregon Union (Sept. 3, 1897-Feb. 10, 1899)

Corvallis, Benton County, OR. The Union Gazette (Feb. 17, 1899-April 20, 1900)

Corvallis Gazette (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) March 5, 1901, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93051660/1901-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

Corvallis Gazette (Corvallis, Benton County, Or.) March 5, 1901, Image 1. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn93051660/1901-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

Posted in Announcements

Halloween Fun Highlighted in Historic Oregon Newspapers

With the familiar chill of early fall comes jack-o’-lanterns on front porches and paper cutouts of bats, black cats, and witches on broomsticks in the windows of homes and school buildings. Halloween is here once more, and the fun and oftentimes spooky traditions of the holiday as celebrated in the state of Oregon have been well documented in Historic Oregon Newspapers.

http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1916-10-29/ed-1/seq-71/

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 29, 1916, Image 71. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1916-10-29/ed-1/seq-71/

A yearly tradition that many look forward to is the Halloween party. The “Society ” page of the November 5, 1922, edition of the Sunday Oregonian detailed the numerous Halloween parties and dances held in posh Portland hotels and private homes. One such party was given in honor of “Miss Dora Gordon, a popular young Portland girl who is attending the University of Oregon.” The party took place at the “Torrey residence in Laurelhurst” and “was most attractively and appropriately decorated in the striking Halloween colors. Dancing and many original features were enjoyed. Refreshments were served around an artistic orange and black table.”

In Grand Ronde, Oregon, the “gymnasium was a place of confusion and merriment on last Monday evening, it being the occasion of an All Halloween social,” reported the November 4, 1910, edition of the Weekly Chemawa American. “Various amazing features were provided for the entertainment of young and old on this occasion. A couple of ‘spectres’ made their earthly appearance on this occasion, to the enjoyment of all. They were arrayed in the latest tailored white sheeting and cut quite a dash.”

Focusing specifically on the entertainment of the young on the festive occasion of Halloween, the Sunday Oregonian in its October 29, 1916, edition ran an article titled “Features for the Young People.” The article included the fiction story “Halloween Witches and Their Pranks” and presented helpful tips on “Fun for Halloweeners.”

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 29, 1916, Image 73. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1916-10-29/ed-1/seq-73/

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 29, 1916, Image 73. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1916-10-29/ed-1/seq-73/

“Fun for Halloweeners” provided many ideas for games, “in addition to the old ‘bobbing for apples’ game,” which young people could play at a Halloween party. One of these Halloween games, “out of which much fun can be gotten,” involved a horseshoe:

A horseshoe is hung in a doorway, and each set of partners is given three lady-apples. Each, in turn, tries to throw the apples, one at a time, through the shoe. The one who succeeds wins the prize. Or, if you do not want to give prizes, she will be pleased to be told that she will marry young. Hang a ring from the gas fixture and ask your guests to try to run a pencil through the ring while walking toward it. The winner will be the next to get married. Nearly all Halloween games have to do with love and marriage.

For Halloween revelers not quite of marrying age, there was still fun to be had, typically at parties given by parents. The October 7, 1948, edition of the Heppner Gazette-Times came to the aid of Heppner, Oregon, parents faced with throwing a kids’ Halloween party. The newspaper stated the “setting for the party might be the backyard, a recreation room or the family living room. The boys and girls will have lots of fun planning the games and making the decorations. Simple-to-make decorations such as jack-o’-lanterns, black cats, balloons and orange and black crepe paper streamers make a fine background for a gathering of ghosts and goblins.”

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 25, 1908, Image 45. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1908-10-25/ed-1/seq-45/

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 25, 1908, Image 45. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1908-10-25/ed-1/seq-45/

The Morning Enterprise, in the October 23, 1912, article “For the Children,” suggested parents have their children play the “lucky candle game” for Halloween: “For this game provide a large tub of water and small candles for those who wish to try their luck. The candles are mounted on bits of wood by means of a pin or thin nail driven through it. Each player then launches his little boat, and the candles are all lighted as quickly as possible. The owner of the candle that burns the longest will be the luckiest guest of the party. The good luck is supposed to remain with the fortunate winner for the ensuing year.” Hopefully, Oregon City parents who heeded the Morning Enterprise article had more than a few fortunate winners at their children’s Halloween parties.

As the sun sets October 31 and costumed revelers, young and old, fill streets and homes with Halloween cheer, take a page from Historic Oregon Newspapers and their coverage of spooky fun and frolic in decades past. Make sure party spots are “most attractively and appropriately decorated in the striking Halloween colors.” Serve refreshments “around an artistic orange and black table.” Play games “out of which much fun can be gotten.” And Happy Halloween!

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 30, 1921, Image 83. http://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn83045782/1921-10-30/ed-1/seq-83/

Sunday Oregonian. (Portland, Or.) October 30, 1921, Image 83. http://oregonnews.uoregon .edu/lccn/sn83045782/1921-10-30/ed-1/seq-83

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Milestone! 10 Million Pages on Chronicling America!

The Oregon Digital Newspaper Program (ODNP) joins the Library of Congress and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in celebrating a major milestone for Chronicling America. As of Tuesday, October 7, 2015, Chronicling America has more than 10 million pages of historic U.S. newspapers available online, transforming access and impacting research of all kinds!

10MillionPoster_LowRes

Launched in 2007 by the Library of Congress and the NEH, Chronicling America is a free, searchable database of historic U.S. newspapers. It provides enhanced and permanent access to historically significant newspapers published in the United States between 1836 and 1922. Chronicling America is part of the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a joint effort between the Library of Congress, the NEH, and partners in 40 states and territories.

Oregon joined the partnership in 2009, when the University of Oregon announced via press release that it had been awarded a $364,042 grant from the NEH and the Library of Congress to digitize historic Oregon newspapers dating from 1860 to 1922. This grant money was augmented by matching funds from the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office and Oregon Heritage Commission through the Oregon Cultural Trust. Since 2009, ODNP, a program of the University of Oregon Libraries, has contributed nearly 300,000 pages of historic Oregon newspaper content to the Chronicling America site.

“Chronicling America is one of the great online treasures, a remarkable window into our history and a testament to the power of collaborative efforts among cultural institutions nationwide,” said Mark Sweeney, the Library of Congress’s Associate Librarian for Library Services. “The Library of Congress is proud to work alongside NEH and all our partner institutions to make this vision a growing reality. In the coming years, we look forward to adding newspapers from the remaining states and territories, as new partners join the program.”

Map of All NDNP Awardees, Current as of 2015.

Map of All NDNP Awardees, Current as of 2015. http://www.loc.gov

“We at the National Endowment for the Humanities are proud to support the Chronicling America historic newspaper project,” said William Adams, NEH Chairman. “This invaluable resource preserves and makes available to all the first draft of America’s history so that we can see the ideas and events that shaped our republic unfold in the headlines of their times.”

Traditionally, historic newspapers have been available for general use through microfilm and shared among users through interlibrary loan (ILL) or by purchasing copies. Chronicling America has revolutionized access to historic newspaper content by digitizing pages and providing full-text keyword access to the content. This has been transformative for research of all kinds. In addition to saving researchers hours of scrolling through reels of microfilm, full-text access allows them to discover connections between research topics and uncover little-known stories in U.S. history.

“Historic newspapers supply vital evidence of our history and culture and are used by students, scholars, historians, arts groups, businesses, urban planners, genealogists, and others,” said Karen Estlund, former Head of  the Digital Scholarship Center for the University of Oregon Libraries. From 2009 to 2015, Estlund was also Project Director for ODNP. Speaking specifically on access to historic Oregon newspapers, Estlund said, “These primary source materials provide a window into the life of local Oregon communities a century or more ago, covering early environmental preservation, industry, agriculture, urban development, Native American and race relations, the establishment of the state, and more.”

East Oregonian. (Pendleton, Umatilla Co., Or.) September 20, 1919, Image 1

Through a few clicks, users of Chronicling America can narrow their focus to newspapers published all on the same day, in the same region, or the entire country. In addition, the content in Chronicling America is available for bulk download and API use. Here are additional facts about Chronicling America:

  • Between January and December 2014, the site logged 3.8 million visits and 41.7 million page views;
  • The resource includes more than 285,000 pages in almost 100 non-English newspapers (French, German, Italian, and Spanish);
  • More than 250 Recommended Topics pages have been created, offering a gateway to exploration for users at any level. Topics include presidential assassinations, historic events such as the sinking of the Titanic, inventions and famous individuals such as the Wright Brothers, and cultural or offbeat subjects such as fashion trends, ping-pong, and world’s fairs;
  • NEH has awarded a total of more than $30 million in grants to 40 partner institutions to contribute to Chronicling America, listed at http://www.loc.gov/ndnp/awards.

In celebration of the Chronicling America milestone, the Library of Congress will post a new blog every Thursday for 10 weeks, beginning October 7, 2015. Each blog post will highlight a different offbeat topic with headlines in Chronicling America, such as “Medical Advances Gone Wrong,” “Coffee ‘Facts’,” and “End of the World.” Subscribe to the blog or check out loc.gov/blogs each Thursday for the week’s installment.

In addition, the National Endowment for the Humanities will launch a special website on September 29, 2015, commemorating the 50th anniversary of NEH’s founding. The website will highlight Chronicling America in an online feature at 50.neh.gov/projects/newspapers-the-first-draft-history. Share online with the hashtag #NEHturns50.

Also, check out the NDNP Impact report, which features information from interviews with NDNP project directors.

About the Library of Congress: Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is the nation’s first-established federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world. It seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs, publications, and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at loc.gov.

About the National Endowment for the Humanities: Celebrating its 50th anniversary as an independent federal agency in 2015, National Endowment for the Humanities brings the best in humanities research, public programs, education, and preservation projects to the American people. To date, NEH has awarded $5 billion in grants to build the nation’s cultural capital – at museums, libraries, colleges and universities, archives, and historical societies – and advance our understanding and appreciation of history, literature, philosophy, and language. Learn more at neh.gov.

Posted in Announcements, Chronicling America, Library of Congress, National Endowment for the Humanities
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